Monday, July 31, 2017

Victoria Viewpoints: Monday, July 31, 2017








Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Provincial scene:

BC Wildfire emergency in Cariboo/Interior

An archive of notes from the BC wildfires 

A Departing Christy Clark




For Christy Clark, it was a great party while it lasted
Clark wanted to quit sooner, but didn't want to leave a mess
"I feel like I get to be me again': former B.C. Premier Christy Clark
'I am done with public life," says Christy Clark
Liberal leader Christy Clark is 'done with public life'
Christy Clark 'done with public life' after resigning as Liberal leader
Who can blame Christy Clark for wanting a clean break?
What Drove Christy Clark Live her "Public Life?"
Class and politics: Christy Clark's ideological contortions made life tougher for the NDP
I thought Christy Clark had potential, but my gut feeling was right
'I am done with pubic life,' says Christy Clark in first public statement since resignation announcement
Former B.C. Premier Christy Clark says her political career is over
B.C. Liberals need to move fast to replace Christy Clark, experts say
'A leader needs to know when it's time to go' Clark on her resignation
Christy Clark says she's 'done with public life' after resignation
Nothing worse than when a politician thinks they're irreplaceable: Christy Clark
Clark addresses media after announcing sudden resignation
Christy Clark quitting starts civil war inside B.C. Liberal party

Full archive of past notes on Ms.Clark's departure available here


--
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visits Williams Lake on tour of BC areas hit by wildfires
'Unimaginable hardship for son many': Justin Trudeau tours B.C.'s wildfire region
25 days and counting: For people in BC's wildfire zone, Trudeau's trip offers little relief
Trudeau urges Canadians to give to B.C. wildfires fjund, but Feds aren't matching donations
BC Ferries turmoil: when full actually means half empty
B.C.'s Seniors Advocate urges people to check in on the elderly as temperatures rise





Ottawa Observations: Monday, July 31, 2017



Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Federal scene for Saturday/Sunday, July 29 & 30, 2017


BC Wildfires

Our archive of notes can be found here

Departure of Christy Clark 

Our archive of notes is available here


Ottawa urged to suspend arms exports to Saudi Arabia amid probe
Indigenous advocates slam Trudeau for comments about Patrick Brazeau
Jagmeet Singh leads NDP leadership fundraising in second quarter of 2017
After Saudi video, Canada has a choice to make on human rights
Jagmeet Singh tops NDP leadership fundraising in 2nd quarter of 2017
Canada condemns Venezuela's 'undemocratic' vote but is not ready to follow U.S. sanctions yet
'Unimaginable hardship for so many': Justin Trudeau tours B.C.'s wildfire region
Liberals try to assuage fears ahead of possible free trade deal with China, documents show
Census data on language shows tip of statistical iceberg about Canada's diversity
Trudeau urges Canadians to give to B.C. wildfires fund, but feds aren't matching donations
25 days and counting: For people in B.C.'s wildfire zone, Trudeau's trip offers little relief
Canada must make sure Saudis live up to human rights guarantees
Remember the Avro Arrow during NAFTA talks
The confusion behind inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women
Pseudo Tories are Tories' biggest problem
Jagmeet Singh fundraises nearly three times his nearest rival despite later entry in NDP leadership race
B.C.'s war on resource development is a national tragedy
Alberta action on First Nations child welfare funding could be setting national example
Federal government rarely match donations for disasters at home
Census 2016: Canada's diversity showcased with hundreds of household languages
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visits Williams lake on tour of B.C. areas hit by wildfires



City's call for comments, leaves many questions outstanding on Watson Island land expropriation


As we outlined on Friday, the City of Prince Rupert is moving forward with their plans for expropriation of a parcel of land at Watson Island, setting in motion a late Friday afternoon call for consultation with the public with this announcement posted to the City website.

However, with a deadline of this Wednesday for any public comments, it's a pretty tight timeline for residents to put together any thoughts, especially considering how they really don't know much about what the city has planned, or any actual cost to the quest by the Mayor and his council to become land barons and potential import/export magnates on the North Coast.

Friday's information release issued towards the end of the business day, outlines the city's plan to amend its Financial plan for 2017, reviewing how their plans to enable expropriation and acquisition of Lot 4 on Watson Island will require an increase of 475,000 to the Land Reserves, bringing the new total to 750,000 dollars.

Council will also be adding on the cost of a 100,000 dollar study to the City's Short Term Debt now to be amended to 990,000. That study is required to explore the cost for jail cell improvements as requested by the RCMP in a recent correspondence with the city.



The city's notes related to that addition to the land reserve however don't, outline what the expected final cost of purchase for the Sun Wave lot will be for the city, particularly as they move forward to expropriate the land currently owned by the city's long time nemesis on all things Watson related.

How much the city plans to spend to grab that lot from SunWave is surely something that perhaps the public should hear more about, before they can reasonably be expected to weigh in with any comments on the process.

The pace of that expropriation plan however will be swift, with Council set to address the issue with Two Special Council sessions scheduled this week.

Residents with any interest in offering up comments related to the plan, as they know of it to this point, have only until 4:30 on Wednesday to deliver their correspondence to the City.

As well, with the introduction of what appears to be an ambitious plan from the City to shift from a land seller, to that of a port developer only revealed last week; the City has yet to offer up any kind of cost estimate for the community as to how much additional investment the city may have to make towards the Watson Site as they move towards making the industrial site ready to welcome import and export shipping opportunities.

Also of some interest to the discussion could be the status of the city's legal issues with not only the Sun Wave group, but those of Colonial Coal another group with an interest in Watson Island.

As recently as May 30th of this year, Colonial Coal was still featuring its plans for Watson Island as part of the information flow on their website, noting that "Watco is currently involved in litigation with the City of Prince Rupert in connection with the acquisition of Watson Island."

Hopefully, when Council members do meet this week, they will offer up significantly more commentary and maybe even a few explanations, as to what the ultimate goal for the City will be as they look to provide rival port facilities to those currently offered by the Prince Rupert Port Authority.

So far Council and the City have not been particularly talkative when it comes to explaining their Watson Island plans, and unlike past ambitions such as the Hays 2.0 vision, or other Civic initiatives as ReDesign Rupert or Sustainable City 2030, we have yet to see any flashy presentations delivered to the city's website.

Last weeks Council session featured a review of the plans from the City's Financial Office Corinne Bomben, who was following up on a comprehensive review of the expropriation process that was delivered by City Manager Robert Long on July 21.

However, despite that volume of material to call on, at last Monday's Council session which lasted less than thirty minutes, not one Council member raised any questions, made comments, or offered up any observations related to what is surely a significant shift in the city's vision for the Watson Island industrial site.

More background on the recent history from Watson can be found here.

While further notes related to City Council Discussions from Council sessions can be found on our archive page.

Cross posted from the North Coast Review


Prince Rupert's Crime Severity Index drops with 2016 numbers

Whatever crime suppression methods that the Prince Rupert detachment of the RCMP have put in place in recent months appear to be working, with the recent review of Crime Severity numbers for 2016 in Canada showing that our North Coast city has seen a reduction from last years levels.

Statistics Canada released their annual report on Crime Severity statistics last week and for Prince Rupert the numbers are showing improving trends in a number of areas.

The Crime Severity Index for Prince Rupert Urban is noted at 121.14 which is down 21.67 percent from last years report and marks for a significant decline from the overall listings compared to 2015.

Other areas of review noted that the violent crime severity index is marked at 130.43 a near 32 percent decline, while the Non Violent crime severity index is listed at 117.5 a 16 percent decrease from last year.



A look at the statistical review over the last five years provides a snapshot of the progress made by the local detachment when it comes to the findings from the Index since 2012. (click on charts to expand)



Prince Rupert has also seen similar reductions in their numbers for rural policing, those jurisdictions where the RCMP respond to calls located outside of the urban city limits.

In 2016, the Crime Severity index for rural areas was listed at 125.33, a 35.98 reduction from 2015.




In the Northwest, Terrace has taken the infamous top spot for Crime severity, moving into the Top 20 Canada wide for communities with a population of 10,000 or more



Crime Severity Index 147.46 (increase of 7.04 percent)
Violent Crime Severity Index 134.82 (decrease of 5.69 percent)
Non Violent Crime Severity index 151.75 (increase of 11.93 percent)

Snapshots for the remainder of the Northwest look as follows.

Smithers has seen some improvement from last years numbers:

Crime Severity Index 124.13 (decrease of 9.61 per cent)
Violent Crime Severity Index 130.80 (decrease of 14.24 percent)
Non Violent Crime severity index 121.44 (decrease of 7.66 percent)

Kitimat had the lowest numbers of the major Northwest communities

Crime Severity Index 70.77 (.06 percent increase)
Violent Crime Severity Index 78.61 (decline of 10.08 percent)
Non violent Crime Severity Index 67.77 (5.05 percent increase)

Things are somewhat more serene on Haida Gwaii with both Masset and Queen Charlotte City keeping their index numbers below 100

Masset  -- Crime Severity Index 90.43  
Queen Charlotte -- Crime Severity Index 68.26

To compare the Northwest to the remainder of the province, two British Columbia communities claimed a Top Ten finish for Canada when it comes to crime and its impact with Williams Lake and Langley among the nations communities facing crime issues in 2016.

Williams Lake Crime Severity Index 221.62 (decrease of 6.21)
Langley City Crime Severity Index 194 (increase of 25.89 percent)

Prince George, the largest community in Northern British Columbia had a Crime Severity Index of 154.39 a four percent increase.

As for the national list, North Battleford, Saskatchewan is noted as the community at the top of the National listings hosting a Crime Severity Index of 352.89 and a Violent Crime Severity index of 337.13

You can select and review the full listings for Northwest communities and all of British Columbia from the Stats Canada website here.

Some background into how they determine their statistical review can be examined here.

Notes related to the work of emergency responders in the Northwest can be found on our archive page.

Cross posted from the North Coast Review

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Victoria Viewpoints: Saturday/Sunday, July 29 & 30, 2017








Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Provincial scene:

BC Wildfire emergency in Cariboo/Interior

An archive of notes from the BC wildfires 

A Departing Christy Clark

High-profile figures mull bids to replace Clark as BC Liberal leader
The dimmed political legacy of Christy Clark
Tears in public, relief in private, as Christy Clark resigns
Weekend poll: What should be Christy Clark's next move?
Former television reporter Jas Johal considers running for BC Liberal leadership
Christy Clark, a campaigner to the core, bows out
Penticton MLA responds to Clark resignation
Christy Clark, a polarizing premier, leaves the political arena with an uncertain legacy
Career highlights for Christy Clark


BC NDP government seeks restorative-justice system for some offenders
First Nations in B.C. call for more control over firefighting, federal funding
How B.C.'s LNG fiasco went so wrong
BC Liberal Email adds grease to sliding trust in News Media
Join the Movement for Effective Health and Addiction Treatment in BC
Q and A with Claire Trevena, B.C.'s new minister of transportation and infrastructure
Will NDP Premier John Horgan love the B.C. Greens to death?
Fixing ICBC
Watch the NDP rely on Vision Vancouver tactics to destroy the B. C. Liberal brand

Ottawa Observations: Saturday/Sunday, July 29 & 30, 20127



Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Federal scene for Saturday/Sunday, July 29 & 30, 2017


BC Wildfires

Our archive of notes can be found here

Departure of Christy Clark 

Our archive of notes is available here


BlackBerry's Ottawa reign comes to an end
Canadian dollar's rapid gain spells trouble for exporters
The worst of economic times in Canada, and the best, too
Why the Bloc Quebecois's future could look like Quebe's Creditiste past
Carolyn Bennett 'agrees with' MMIWG inquiry reset request
Jason Kenney launches UCP leadership campaign with criticism of PM, Alberta NDP
Trudeau urges Canadians to donate to the Red Cross at B.C. wildfire fundraiser
Omnitrax must repair Churchill rail line: Justin Trudeau
B.C. First Nations call for more control over firefighting, federal funding
Trudeau says he will visit B.C. wildfire zones amid shifting landscape
Ottawa spends $150 million maintaining Pickering land it seized for an airport never built
Ottawa's secret plan for what to do when the Queen dies
Goodale must investigate racism allegations against CSIS
NDP leadership candidate Guy Caron's jobs and growth plan is a political winner
Killing the entrepreneurial spirit
Unwritten tale of Fear and Loathing in Trudeautown
Fix MWIW inquiry, or scrap it
Canada 150 fell flat because abasement trumped gratitude
Submarine scours Lake Ontario as search for lost Avro Arrow prototypes starts
Group says Canada's long-awaited 'world class' Arctic research station is nearly complete
Justin Trudeau: Feds will use all options to make Omnitrax pay for Churchill rail repairs



Friday, July 28, 2017

Victoria Viewpoints: Friday, July 28, 2017








Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Provincial scene:

BC Wildfire emergency in Cariboo/Interior

An archive of notes from the BC wildfires 

A Departing Christy Clark

Short of any more miracles, Christy Clark throws in the towel
Clark's exit will tempt NDP to call an election
Clark's resignation opens door to big field of leadership hopefuls
Christy Clark through the years
Christy Clark resigns as leader of B.C. Liberal party, Rich Coleman to serve as interim
Who will be the next leader of the BC Liberals?
Christy Clark to walk-away with hefty pension: Canadian Taxpayers Federation
Christy Clark: a career timeline of B.C.'s 35th premier
Clark stepping down as B.C. Liberal leader, MLA: Coleman interim leader
A campaigner to the core bows out
Coleman praises Clark, will be interim leader but wont' seek job
Why B.C. Liberals might lean on Michael lee to be their next leader after Christy Clark
BC Liberal leadership possibilities to consider after Clark
Christy Clark undoing comes down to three tactical miscalculations
BC Liberal Leader Christy Clark resigns following defeat to NDP
Christy Clark thanks B.C. Liberal party members after announcing looming resignation
Weaver thanks Clark for service to B.C.
Christy Clark to step down as BC Liberal leader
Christy Clark resigns as Leader of the BC Liberal party
B.C. Liberal party to soon work on Leadership process
Christy Clark resigns as B.C. Liberal leader
Parties react to Clark's resignation
Christy Clark resigning as Liberal leader
Christy Clark resigns as leader of BC Liberal Party
Christy Clark to resign as leader of BC Liberal Party next week
Christy Clark announces she will quit as B.C. Liberal leader
Christy Clark to resign as B.C. Liberal leader
Former BC premier Christy Clark says she intends to resign
Christy Clark to resign as leader of BC Liberals, MLA
Christy Clark resigns as leader of Liberal party
Christy Clark steps down as leader of BC Liberals  NCR


Parsing the NDP blame game on LNG
Feds halt Taseko Mine's drilling activities at New Prosperity
New course helps First Nations' Managers take back their housing
BC's New Gov't pledges urgent action on Education - Canada Should, Too
Attorney General David Eby defends donation ban delay
What the Supreme Court rulings mean for pipeline proponents (it could be good news)
Dithering by B.C., Ottawa helped kill Pacific NorthWest LNG energy, CEO says
Western Forest Products shuts operations at Port Alberni sawmill
Verdict on B.C.'s year old foreign buyer tax sill up for debate
Liquefied Natural Gas projects face existential crisis in B.C.
Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to be closely scrutinized, B.C. Environment Minister says
BC NDP maintains legal defence of 15% tax on foreign buyers
Vancouver's affordable housing 'intentions' nothing but empty words
Pacific NorthWest LNG project is dead, but B.C.'s LNG dream lives on
NDP government to spur B.C. school construction
NDP should check what's down in the cellar
Clark  might hope to return as premier
Mayor Gregor Robertson denies Vision Vancouver too closely tied to developers
NDP government to spur B.C. school construction

Ottawa Observations: Friday, July 28, 2017



Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Federal scene for Friday, July 28, 2017


BC Wildfires

Our archive of notes can be found here

Departure of Christy Clark 

Our archive of notes is available here.




Ottawa calls for investigation into Saudi Arabia's apparent use of Canadian-made armoured vehicles against citizens
At least three firms in competition to design new warships for Canada
Opposition, activist call on Liberals to sanction Venezuelan government
China accuses Canadian-Chinese tycoon of major role in pyramid scheme
Ottawa ready to review Saudi arms deal after violent crackdown apparently used Canadian-made vehicles
Proposed corporation rules could be taxing for dozens of MPs
Underwater vehicle probes depths of Lake Ontario for long-missing Avro Arrow model planes
Chippewas must pay energy giant's legal bills in lost court battle
Border guards fired guns 18 times in a decade - accidentally in most cases
The AFN meetings are over, now where does the work begin?
Loonie shoots higher as oil rises, economy posts strong growth
Toronto man accused of spying for China and Taiwan
Supreme Court makes it clear. Indigenous peoples can't veto pipelines
Canadian values? We don't mutilate women
Some good news for Canada's economy
Petronas debacle confirms that Canada simply isn't open for business
Forced Aboriginal sterilization a devastating failure of medical system
Quebec's economy crawled out of the doghouse. Now, it's a powerhouse
Reports of Saudi abuses using Canadian-made armoured vehicles cause 'deep concern' in Ottawa
Successful Toronto businessman fights government charge that he is a spy for China
On Dunkirk, Khadr and claptrap about our outgoing Governor General
Justin Trudeau pleased after U.S. officials scrap border adjustment tax plan
Feds start fiscal year with modest surplus, but big spending on the horizon
A beer with Andrew Scheer: Conservative Leader, Popcorn addict ... Feminist?
Feds halt Taseko Mine's drilling activities at New Prosperity




Prince Rupert Council to host Two Special Regular Council sessions next week



A pair of notices posted to the City of Prince Rupert Website are issuing the call for Council members to assemble two times next week, with Two Special Regular Council sessions scheduled.

The Notices which are very short, advise that Council members will gather at 5 PM on the following days:

Wednesday, August 2nd (see Notice here)

and

Friday, August 4th (See Notice here)

Neither notice offers up much in the way of background as to what the issues are that will require the Council to attend to their duties twice in the same week.

So far the City Council Agenda Pages provide some notes related to the August 2nd meeting, which seem to suggest that council will be providing required readings for the City's Five Year Financial Plan Amendment Bylaw.



You can review the full details of the Agenda package from the City's website here.

It's somewhat puzzling why the Five Year Financial Plan requirements were not included as part of the Monday July 24th Council session, that meeting was quite light on material, taking the Council members less than thirty minutes to review their business that night.

Update: In a late Friday afternoon advisory, the City outlined some further background to the meetings set for next week

The statement and additional documentation are directed towards planned changes in the financial plan to address areas related to the acquisition of Lot 4 on Watson Island, as well as for a short term loan for the design of a new RCMP Cell block.

The City's statement reads as follows:

The City is providing notice that City Council will consider a proposed amendment to the 2017 Financial Plan to be considered by City Council at a Special Meeting of Council August 2nd, 2017 at 5:00pm in Council Chambers. 

The notice details changes to the Operating Fund proposed in the 2017 Amended Financial Plan Bylaw No. 3416, 2017. These changes are proposed to address expenses not anticipated when the initial Financial Plan was adopted in April. 

The proposed changes will not result in any change to City servicing levels or approved operating budgets, instead drawing funds from reserves and a short-term loan through the Municipal Finance Authority.

The proposed amendment to the financial plan can be reviewed below (click to enlarge)

The notice can also be reviewed here.



Should any resident wish to submit comments they can to so by contacting Corinne Bomben via fax at 250-627-0999 or deliver their correspondence in person to City Hall.

Any comments must be submitted no later than 4:30 on Wednesday August 2nd.

Considering the tight timeline for comments and the rather late in the day notice from the City of the opportunity to provide them, it will be somewhat interesting to see how many residents may even know about the topic, let alone put any potential contribution together with but three business days to do so.

For more items related to Prince Rupert City Council see our archive page here.

Cross posted from the North Coast Review

Christy Clark steps down as leader of BC Liberals

Former Premier Christy Clark in Lax Kw'alaams in Janaury.
Ms. Clark announced her resignation as leader of the
BC Liberal party and as MLA this morning


Whenever the NDP government calls the Legislature to its return, there will be one long time fixture from the recent BC political scene missing from the Chamber.

Friday morning, BC Liberal leader Christy Clark announced her intention to step down as leader of the party and her plans to leave politics.

Ms. Clark who served as British Columbia's 35th Premier from 2011-2017 delivered a short statement that expressed her pride in what the BC Liberals had accomplished and confidence for the future of the province.

Her resignation, which follows the agreement between the NDP and Greens which propelled Mr. Horgan to power, will take effect on Friday, August 4th.

The BC Liberal Facebook page shared the text of Ms. Clark's resignation in a posting.




With the Liberals now soon to be focused on the selection of a new leader, the announcement of Ms. Clark's departure from the political stage will now seemingly provide Premier John Horgan's government with some additional breathing room to settle into their political agenda.

Political pundits will now be reviewing the last few weeks for clues as to whether Ms. Clark has chosen to exit the stage of her own accord, or if the wheels were put in motion by party officials to suggest that her time as leader was at an end.

The Party executive will now meet within 28 days to set the rules for the leadership election process. Rich Coleman, the former Deputy Premier and LNG Minister will take over the leadership on an interim basis as the BC Liberals move forward with their work ahead.

The summer months and the fall will now offer up the manoeuvring of potential leadership candidates for the BC Liberals, both from within the current legislature line up and outside of the seat of the Provincial government.

The seismic waves of the shift in the political landscape in BC have already produced a range of news items and commentaries, with much more yet to come through the weekend.

We will archive those notes below:

July 28 


--
Christy Clark thanks B.C. Liberal party members after announcing looming resignation
Weaver thanks Clark for service to B.C.
Christy Clark to step down as BC Liberal leader
Christy Clark resigns as Leader of the BC Liberal party
B.C. Liberal party to soon work on Leadership process
Christy Clark resigns as B.C. Liberal leader
Parties react to Clark's resignation
Christy Clark resigning as Liberal leader
Christy Clark resigns as leader of BC Liberal Party
Christy Clark to resign as leader of BC Liberal Party next week
Christy Clark announces she will quit as B.C. Liberal leader
Christy Clark to resign as B.C. Liberal leader
Former BC premier Christy Clark says she intends to resign
Christy Clark to resign as leader of BC Liberals, MLA
Christy Clark resigns as leader of Liberal party

More notes related to the North Coast in the Legislature can be found here.

Cross posted from the North Coast Review

Port Edward remains "Open for business" despite setback of PNW LNG cancellation

Mayor Dave MacDonald has outlined
the District of Port Edward's response
to Tuesday's cancellation of the
PNW LNG project
Mayor Dave MacDonald of Port Edward continues to remain optimistic about his community's future in the wake of this weeks cancellation of the Pacific NorthWest LNG project.

In a statement issued on Thursday, the Mayor of the District noted that the news had been received with very mixed feelings and had required a few days for the District's Council to process the events of the week.

The correspondence to residents offers up reassurance that the efficient day to day operations of running "one of the nicest locations on the BC coast" will continue.

On the theme of the announcement of the cancellation, Mayor MacDonald notes that the news was not anticipated, as the District had signed off on potential tax agreements and was looking forward, to working with their First Nation and other partners to moving forward with infrastructure development to meet the service demands that would have come with the construction of the LNG facilities, along with the rapid development and community growth.

Mayor MacDonald observed as to the hard work that had gone into the preparation and planning as well as to how some plans may have to be delayed for now.

"All the hard work and planning that has been put into place will continue to be available and useful for future development ... We will continue to work towards seeing Wampler Way road become a reality, maybe not now but certainly in the future. This will support community partners in developing the land in and around Wampler Way for business and residential growth"

Mr. MacDonald also highlighted the strengthened relationships with the areas First Nations communities, something that he says the District will continue to work with towards more new projects and opportunities.

He also had appreciation for the hard work of the Prince Rupert Port Authority, particularly with Ridley Island and the growth in and around Prince Rupert.  As well he noted the cooperative spirit from the District's relationships with those stakeholders in the region that will see the rail crossing issues in the community resolved over the  summer.

He also noted that phase one of the Senior's housing project in the community will bring eight affordable houses to the District this year, with the potential for more housing opportunities in the future.

He closes his letter to residents by noting some of the benefits that had come with the arrival of Pacific NorthWest in the community over the last five years.

"Although the PNW LNG will not go ahead, many community events and local project such as the restoration of North Pacific Cannery benefitted from PNW donations and supported these projects"

Looking towards the future, Mayor MacDonald reminds residents of the District that the councils philosophy of being "Open for Business" will continue, while also thanking the larger region for its support and the opportunity for Port Edward to be engaged in discussions about projects that can have a positive impact on the region.

You can review the Port Edward Mayor's full commentary for the community here.

Mayor MacDonald's letter to residents is just the latest of correspondences from local politicians related to the Pacific NorthWest LNG cancellation.

Also heard over the last 48 hours have been MLA Jennifer Rice, as well as MP Nathan Cullen.

That leaves only Prince Rupert Mayor Lee Brain as keeping a low profile when it comes to most talked about news event of thew week in the region.

As of Friday morning, the City had still not issued any form of information release for the public related to the decision from Petronas to bring to an end its North Coast plans., whether through the city website or Mayor Brain's Facebook page

For more items related to the now cancelled project see our archive page here.

More notes on developments from Port Edward can be reviewed here.

Cross posted from the North Coast Review

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Victoria Viewpoints: Thursday, July 27, 2017








Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Provincial scene:

BC Wildfire emergency in Cariboo/Interior

An archive of notes from the BC wildfires 

B.C. Premier says he expects softwood-lumber deal before NAFTA talks begin
B.C. court acquits four men accused of human smuggling in Tamil migrant case
Horgan sees no conflict in B.C. government's position on LNG
B.C. premier says Canada-U.S. close to deal on softwood, but negotiations intense
Woodfibre LNG project confident it will move forward despite Pacific Northwest setback
Scrambling for satisfying answers part of B.C. transition curve
Judy Darcy to 'pour heart and soul' into mental health/addictions
John Horgan travels to U.S. to talk softwood with Trump trade reps
First Nations LN \G deals left hanging
Chinatown doesn't have to lose community to condos: MP Jenny Kwan
Report says marine oil tankers less likely to spill oil than pipelines or trains
BC Liberals' claims they're being shut out of wildfire info 'just nonsense': Public Safety Minister
New supervised injection service opens in Vancouver
B.C. Premier John Horgan travels to Washington DC to talk softwood lumber
How the NDP and Greens can grow BC's cooperative economy
Metro Vancouver to ask B.C. NDP government about status of bridge replacement for George Massey Tunnel
How B.C. Liberal outsourcing made government more opaque

Ottawa Observations: Thursday, July 27, 2017



Our compilation of some of the stories of note from the day, reviewing the political developments from the Federal scene for Thursday, July 27, 2017


BC Wildfires

Our archive of notes can be found here


B.C. Premier says he expects softwood-lumber deal before NAFTA talks begin
Canadian job creation is at worst since 2009 recession, payroll surveys suggests
Mini cabinet shuffle looms in Ottawa ahead of bigger changes in 2018
SCC resource decisions do not put blind faith in the NEB
Ottawa announces plan to protect boreal caribou after legal action taken
Maxime Bernier eyes finance critic job, hints at future Conservative leadership run
First Nations leaders reject call for MMIWG commissioners to step down
MMIWG inquiry now reviewing conduct of police officers
Military cops struggle to enforce mental health laws
U.S. Republican leaders announce end of border tax proposal
Let's enjoy this moment of American envy of Canada
Naming Sen. Murray Sinclair to probe alleged racism in the Thunder Bay police force right now
Condemnations of Khadr reek of double standards
Polls, the Ugly American, Rolling Stone and the Mad hatter
Rolling Stone's Trudeau profile isn't unusually fawning - it's just late to the party
A conflict of interests between the BoC and Trudeau government
Years after two ships brought 568 migrants to Canada, seven acquittals and one conviction
Fears grown in Ottawa that Bank of Canada hiked rates too soon
Scheer wrong to propose return to partisan Senate
Liberals' China policy: We can't beat them, so let's join!
3 years after woman's death, Red Cross signs up to monitor CBSA detainees more often
Justin Trudeau's Rolling Stone cover wan't received too well by Americans ... or Canadians
Justin Trudeau's approval goes up despite continued division over Omar Khdar settlement: Ipsos poll
First Nations leaders divided on troubled MMIW inquiry: Bellegarde
Increase in Foreign Workers through Federal program still a problem, says union
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issues statement on Korean War Veterans Day


TransCanada Pipelines to review PRGT project in wake of Petronas cancellation

With the cancellation of the Pacific NorthWest LNG project,
the fate of the Prince Rupert Gas Transmission line is now under review


While most of the attention over the last few days has been directed towards the announcement by Petronas that they were cancelling the Pacific NorthWest LNG project, another major project related to the LNG terminal is now under further review.

With no destination now in place for it's planned pipeline network, TransCanada pipelines has announced that is now reviewing their options related to the Prince Rupert Gas Transmission project and will continue to focus on their significant investments in new and existing natural gas infrastructure to meet customer needs.

In a media release issued following the Petronas announcement, Trans Canada noted that as part of their agreement with the Malaysian Energy giant's affiliate Progress Energy, following receipt of a termination notice, TransCanada would be reimbursed for the full costs and carrying charges incurred to advance the PRGT project.

Karl Johansen, TransCanada's Executive Vice President and President of Canada and Mexico gas pipeline and energy development further noted that TransCanada expects to receive that termination payment later this year.

As for fate of the PRGT pipeline route, the TransCanada announcement provided a bit of background on the history of the planning for the line and where the future may lead.

We are proud of the work we have done along the PRGT route, which has allowed us to sign 14 Project Agreements with First Nations and secure the key regulatory approvals and permits. 

We have built strong new relationships, and we look forward to continuing our strong partnerships with First Nations and communities in B.C. as we develop other natural gas assets, including our North Montney Mainline project. 

This important project is backed by independent 20-year commercial service agreements with 11 shippers (including Progress Energy), and pending regulatory approvals, we remain ready to move forward. 

There is still a strong need for Canadian natural gas supplies to get to market, and the infrastructure we are building in Alberta and British Columbia - including recently announced multi-billion dollar investments in our NGTL system and North Montney Mainline - are designed to help move natural gas supplies to markets where they are needed.

You can review the full announcement from TransCanada here.

Even before Tuesday's cancellation by Petronas, the pipeline project had run into another delay, as a Federal court had ordered the National Energy Board to re-examine jurisdiction issues related to the pipeline route across Northern BC.

Another area of note related to the Petronas decision could be the fate of a number of benefit agreements that had been signed related to the project.

TransCanada pipelines had signed a number of benefits agreements, including training opportunities with local First Nations as part of their work towards securing the pipeline to the North Coast.

Metlakatla signs pipeline benefits agreements tie to LNG development
Metlakatla and Prince Rupert Gas Transmission sign LNG pipeline project agreement
BC's Liberal Government signs LNG agreements with Lax Kw'alaams and Metlakatla First Nation
Prince Rupert Gas Transmission signs project agreement with Lax Kw'alaams Band
PRGT signs project agreement with Gitxsan Hereditary Chiefs
Skills training programs making a difference in B.C.
TRICORP to benefit from $250,000 partnership with Gas Pipeline firms
Nisga'a reach agreement on gas pipeline and keep their own LNG ambitions on track

Further background on the now cancelled Pacific NorthWest LNG project can be reviewed on our archive page.

Cross posted from the North Coast Review



Area environmental groups find much to celebrate with PNW LNG cancellation

Word of Tuesday's cancellation of the Pacific NorthWest LNG project spread quickly around the region and for the regions environmental movement members there was much to celebrate about the decision.

Across the Northwest groups which had frequently expressed their opposition to the proposed development at Lelu Island took to their Social media platforms, eager to share their enthusiasm at the end of the PNW LNG story for the region.

Among the groups sharing word of their success were the Prince Rupert Environmental Society and Friends of Wild Salmon which offered congratulations to their supporters for their efforts during the five year process that put the spotlight on their concerns.






The World Wildlife Fund also hailed the news of the cancellation of the project, noting how it was a win for wildlife not only in the Skeena estuary, but  across British Columbia.

Also Included in those that were in celebration mode was the Prince Rupert office of UFAWU-Unifor which posted their thoughts to Facebook on Tuesday.

The local union that represents fish workers in the community had long been in opposition to the proposed development at Lelu Island, with UFAWU's Joy Thorkelson frequently raising the topic in her role as a city councillor with the City of Prince Rupert.



In addition to the social media shout outs, a group in Prince Rupert celebrated the decision to bring the project to an end, gathering in Mariner's Park on Tuesday following the announcement.

North Coast MLA Jennifer Rice also touched on the theme of Flora Banks in her Wednesday statement on the demise of the project, noting how some in the community were celebrating the protection of salmon habitat off of Lelu Island.

In a Tuesday evening statement, NDP MP Nathan Cullen also noted that much of the opposition to the project came from the site selection and a lack of Social Licence for the proposed development

A look at some of the fall out and opinion sharing on the Petronas decision can be found on our archive page here.

Cross posted from the North Coast Review